Out of Office

25 Reasons to Let Your Employees Work Out Of Office

25 Reasons to Let Your Employees Work Out Of Office

If you’re a leader or manager wondering whether to allow some of your team to work away from the office, we’ll give you 25 reasons why it might be the right thing to do – for you, them, and your future success.

Listen to the episode here:

The 25 Reasons

Improve Productivity

People are more productive working from home, despite the fear they will slack off.

  1. No more commutes
    Australians spend 4.4 hours a week commuting

  2. Fewer interruptions and distractions
  3. Fewer sick days
    They even work when they’re sick!

Improve Work Flows/Performance

  1. Meetings become more efficient
  2. Collaboration is improved
  3. Deferred communication reduces wasted time
  4. You can operate 24/7

Happier, Healthier Workers

  1. They are happier
    You’re 87% more likely to love your job if you work from home

  2. And healthier
  3. They suffer less stress
    82% of telecommuters report they have lower stress since they started telecommuting

Talent Management

  1. Not restricted by location
  2. Freelance talent markets open up
  3. Employees want it
    70% of workers would rather telecommute than work in an office
    GWA suggests this number is higher

  4. Attract Gen Ys
  5. Be competitive
  6. Keep them when their personal circumstances change
  7. Help them move
  8. Keep Gen Ys
  9. Keep experienced workers

Lower Costs

  1. Office costs
    GWA has an online calculator

  2. HR costs

Fit for the Future

  1. Natural fit for the skills of the future
    The Institute of the Future has identified 10 key skills of the future

  2. You’re preparing yourself for future distributed work
  3. You become a better leader
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Your Next Out Of Office Workspace: The Gym

With the rising popularity of Out Of Office work, some enterprising gym and health club operators are expanding their lounges to provide members with co-working spaces. Club operators had noticed many of their members hanging out at the gym after a workout, using the lounge WiFi to get work done. So they decided to tap into this by offering more accommodating facilities for Out Of Office work. This is great for workers as it provides them with another venue for Out Of Office work, and it’s great for gym and health club operators because people who spend more time at the club also spend more money there.

Read the full WSJ article.

What do you think? Would you enjoy doing your work at the gym? Have youc ome across any innovative co-working spaces? Please let us know in the comments below…

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Are Your Managers Prepared for the Future of Work?

There’s a lot of talk about the future of work, and much of it is centred around technology. But the biggest factor that will determine your success – or failure – is not technology, but people.

The article The Future Of Work Is Here: Are Your Managers Prepared? lists five aspects about the future of work that will affect your bottom line:

  • Productivity
  • Technology
  • Big Data
  • Organizational Structure
  • Leadership

Read the full article here.

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Flexible work can harm your career – if you’re a man

We strongly believe organisations should be encouraging Out of Office work, because of its many advantages: flexibility, greater productivity, better work-life integration for employees, and so on. But it’s sad to see many Australian organisations haven’t embraced this idea. In fact, it’s just the opposite – especially for men.

A report by Bain & Company and Chief Executive Women found that women with flexible working arrangements are more likely to move into senior leadership roles, but men who do the same are penalised. As a result, many men in large organisations don’t take up flexible working arrangements because it harms their career.

Read the full article here.

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Professional Development for Distributed Teams

Professional Development

Members of distributed teams value and expect opportunities for professional development just as much as in-office team members. As a leader or manager, you might need to be proactive and innovative to find ways to help accelerate the experience curve for your distributed team members.

Listen to the episode here:

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Five Tips for Leading a Distributed Team

As Out of Office work grows, managers and leaders have to learn new skills to work effectively and get the best from their teams. For experienced leaders in particular, the switch can be challenging because they are outside their comfort zone. Melissa Lamson shares five ideas for leaders in her article “How to effectively lead virtual teams”:

  1. Over-communicate about communication.
  2. Define roles.
  3. Build trust.
  4. Don’t forget the face-to-face and one-on-one.
  5. Respect cultural differences.

Read the full article here.

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10 Tricks to Master Google Hangouts

Video conferencing has rapidly become a preferred communications tool for teams, and Google Hangouts is one of the easiest video conferencing tools to use. It runs straight from your web browser; no need to install special software, just visit Google Hangouts and invite guests to join you.

But there’s more to Hangouts than this simplicity suggests. Lifehacker’s David Nield shares 10 tips for getting the most out of Google Hangouts:

  • Search your conversations from Gmail
  • Make it easier to be found
  • Mute notifications
  • Doodle on your messages
  • Tell your contacts what you’re up to
  • Tell your contacts where you are
  • Use different ringtones for different people
  • Keep chats on top of other windows
  • Format text in conversations
  • Change the background colour

Read about these tips in detail at Lifehacker Australia

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Embrace Distributed Work – Don’t Just Tolerate It

It’s not easy for leaders to say they “tolerate” their team members working Out of Office. And indeed, sometimes they boast about how flexible they are in allowing it. But that’s like fathers who proudly say they are “babysitting” the kids so their wife can have a night out with the girls. It’s not babysitting, it’s parenting!

In the same way, Out Of Office work should be treated as the norm, not the exception. If you’re a leader with a distributed team, embrace it.

James Ware says his research over 10 years suggest that a flexible workplace strategy and an aggressive remote/distributed work program can reduce workforce support costs by 40% or more. That’s a huge advantage!

He writes more about this in his article Smart Leaders Don’t Just Tolerate Distributed Work; They Embrace It.

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Infographic: How to Run Successful Remote Meetings

How to Run a Remote Meeting – An infographic by Hubstaff.com

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The Onion: Working From Home Vs. Working In An Office

The Onion turns its satirical eye to the differences between working in a regular office and working Out Of Office.

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