Out of Office

Dragos Roua: The 5 Fundamental Rules Of Working From Home

Digital Nomad, Dragos Roua, lists his five fundamental rules for working from home.

  • Setup a specific workspace
  • Split work into edible chunks
  • Work outside home
  • Go out
  • Thoroughly log each day

We advocate several of these ideas in our book, and have come to appreciate the benefits of the others since publication. It’s well worth reading Dragos’ article in full at Lifehack.

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Working From Home – Is It The Future?

There’s no question that working from home is growing in popularity, and obviously we’re big fans of it. Here’s an interesting infographic showing some statistics about how fast it’s growing:

Working From Home -- Is It The Future? by Staff.com
Staff.com – Connecting Great Companies with Global Talent

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Three Other Out of Office Books

Three Out of Office BooksAs the Out of Office trend continues, more authors have been writing about this lifestyle. In this episode, we review three other books in this area and compare them to our book.

Listen to the episode here:

The Three Books

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31 Simple Ways to Maximize Efficiency in Your Home Office

Maximize Efficiency in Your Home OfficeWorking from home gives you great flexibility, but also forces you to create your own systems, processes, and discipline. This can be a challenge for some people, especially because everybody is different. So there’s no one-size-fits-all system you can pull off a shelf and apply to your circumstances.

But this Lifehack checklist 31 Simple Ways to Maximize Efficiency in Your Home Office is a useful starting point. Look through this list and borrow what works for you when setting up your own system.

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A Study into the Work-Life Balance of Homeworkers

The University of Loughborough is conducting a study into the work-life balance of Out Of Office workers. Here’s their call to action:

There is little research into the work-life balance of people who work from home. The purpose of this study is to explore the factors that influence how people who work from home manage their work-life balance. I am seeking adults aged 18 or over who work from home (part-time, full-time or some of the time) to take part.

This survey consists of a set of questions about working from home, your preferences, and some demographic questions. It should take around 15 minutes to complete.

I took the survey – it’s a set of multiple-choice questions. If you’d like to contribute then visit the survey’s home page.

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Cloud Computing For Out of Office Collaboration

Cloud Computing For Out of Office CollaborationDespite the explosive growth of cloud computing, few organisations are using it effectively for collaboration, especially with their Out of Office workers. In this episode, we share some practical tools to foster online collaboration.

Listen to the episode here:

Additional Resources

General

Business Documents

Research and Notes

Calendars and Appointments

CRM

E-Mail

  • Podio (replacement for internal e-mail)

Collaboration Tools

  • Online meeting tools: Skype, Google Hangout, GoToMeeting, GoToWebinar, GoToTraining, WebEx, MS-Lync
  • Support for online meetings: Bubbl.us (mind mapping), Padlet.com (bulletin board)
  • Online Forums: Yammer (like a private Facebook group for business), Ning (like private Facebook)

Productivity Tools

  • Basecamp.com (project management)
  • Support ticket systems like Bugzilla, Trac, JIRA
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Do You Need a Change of Scenery?

One of my clients, Garth Roberts, posted this picture to Facebook earlier this year:

Garth In Banff

He said it was so successful that he’s planning to do it again every quarter. And he’s inspired me to go away for a similar trip (not as far as Banff, though!) to do some solid writing on my next book.

What can you do to get into the right mindset for something important? This is one of the big benefits of the Out of Office work style. So create the opportunity if you can!

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5.6M Australians Used the Internet to Work Out Of Office in 2013

According to research conducted by the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA), 5.6 million Australian adults used the Internet to work Out Of Office during 2013. Other interesting findings of the ACMA survey include:

  • 51% of Australian workers either accessed the Internet outside normal working hours or were teleworkers
  • 2.8 million Australians (49%) worked from home at least two days a week while 863,000 (15%) worked away from the office one day a week
  • 68% of digital workers used laptops to work Out Of Office, 33% used smartphones, 21% used tablets and 30% used a PC
  • 95% of respondents reported benefits such as greater flexibility, improved productivity and access to home comforts
  • 24% of respondents cited problems such as reduced access to communications services while 20% said they missed having access to colleagues

Via ComputerWorld.

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Tick Tock – by Kim Mason

tick-tockThis is a little gem of a book about time management for home office workers, written by somebody who is speaking from practical experience.

Kim Mason is an independent travel agent working under the TravelManagers banner, and she is one of 400+ travel agents in that organisation who work from home. I came across Kim because I’m speaking at the TravelManagers national conference next month, and Kim and I are collaborating on a workshop about time management and productivity for home office workers.

This book is short but full of practical advice for anybody who works from a home office or is contemplating making the move there. I particularly like that it’s a nice blend of strategy and tactics, from the Big Picture questions (for example, why you decided to work from home) to practical daily suggestions (such as how to choose your “open for business” hours).

Buy the book from Amazon.com.

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Work-life Balance and Out Of Office Working Mums

Fiona MacDonald, research fellow at the Centre for Work + Life, University of South Australia, has written an interesting article for the Sydney Morning Herald entitled Working from home might not be the answer to work-life balance. MacDonald interviewed women employed as small-business bookkeepers, some working from home others working in an office. For women with caring responsibilities who work from home, MacDonald observed the following:

  • they have greater flexibility in their daily routines but “an increased likelihood work would have to be done on weekends and in the evenings and at night”
  • “tension between their caring and paid work responsibilities”
  • feelings of isolation; missing the social experience of the workplace, and not having any leisure time

MacDonald concludes with some useful advice for Out Of Office working mums that echoes the ideas and techniques we describe in our book:

  • paid work hours need to be scheduled and contained
  • contain the spaces in which work is performed so the door can be shut when the paid work day is over
  • have a mix of hours at home and hours in a separate workplace to help maintain social connections

Read Fiona MacDonald’s article in full at SMH.com.

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